Amels are Showing Their Largest Yacht at FLIBS

The Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show or FLIBS is under on from 30 Oct till 03 Nov 2019 at Fort Lauderdale. Netherlands based shipyard Amels, which celebrated its centenary in 2018 is showing the largest yacht built by them at FLIBS 2019. The yacht is called, “Here Comes the Sun”.

Exteriors of this 83 m long vessel have been designed by Tim Heywood. The yacht displaces 2,400 tons at full load, which is larger than a naval corvette. It has six decks of sumptuous, relaxed and modern luxury for soaking in the life at sea in style. The interiors have been done by Winch Design and are inspired by natural tones and materials. The concept of the interior design is completely customised as per the owner’s requirement. The vessel offers an owner’s deck which is 43 m long and has 300 sq-m of area. This vessel has accommodation for 18 guests in accommodation spread over 230 sq-m. There is a beach areas for recreational purposes over 87 sq-m while a 6.6 x 3.6 m swimming pool provides the space for cooling down. There is 138 sq-m of storage (garage) to stow the watersport equipment like boats and jet-skis. The vessel can hold two 11 m boats plus other water sport equipment and scuba diving equipment. The Foc’sle has a helipad which can receive a 3000 kg helicopter. There is additional accommodation space for 25 crew including the Captain.

Inside, the yachts boasts a spam, sauna, steam room, lounging area and folding down terrace doors to bring the guests very close to the waters around. There is attention to detail like, all the metals are in a matte, bronze finish so that nothing glares back at the guests. The bathrooms are finished in soft, honed marble and as far as possible all surfaces are non-reflective to be easy on the eyes.

In addition to its length of 83 m, the yacht has a beam of 14.54 m, (beam is the width of a ship at its widest portion). It has a draught of 3.85 m. Using its two Caterpillar engines it can cruise at a speed of 17.5 knots across the oceans for 5,500 nautical miles before it needs to enter port for replenishing the food, water and fuel.

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