Citroen C6G_cDuring the high speed journey undertaken by Captain Haddock and Tintin in the Lancia Aurelia driven by Arturo Benedetto Giovanni Guiseppe Pietro Archangelo Alfredo Cartoffoli da Milano, they had a large number of near misses with various cars and trucks. All these vehicles were depicted beautifully by Herge in the background. Drivers of these vehicles have been shown with beautiful expressions of surprise, fear, anger etc. After missing the Chevrolet 3800 truck, Arturo B G G P A A C da Milano forced a blue car off road. This was an old car (for the period depicted in the book “The Calculus Affair”), a Citroen C6.

Citroen C6G_1

This car manufactured in France from 1929 till 1932. It was the more luxurious version of the C4. Styling of these cars was highly influenced by the American cars of the period. These cars were made available in a number of body styles:-

  • Berine Luxe.
  • Conduite Interieure Luxe.
  • Familiale Luxe.
  • 2-seat cabriolet.
  • 4-seat cabriolet.
  • 2-seat faux cabriolet.
  • 4-seat faux cabriolet.
  • Torpedos.
  • Taxi.
  • Coupe de Ville.

Citroen C6G_5

These cars were powered by a 2,650 cc (161.713 cu-inch) inline six cylinder naturally aspirated petrol engine. These engines breathed through two side valves per cylinder and produced 50 BHP at 2,700 rpm. This power was transmitted from the front positioned engine to the rear wheels through a three speed manual gear box. This engine could push the 4,600 mm (181.1 inches) long, 1,730 mm (68.1 inches) wide and 1,800 mm (70.9 inches) tall car, weighing 1,350 kg (2,976 lb) to a maximum speed of 109 km/h (68 mph).The front and rear axles were suspended using semi elliptical springs. Stopping power was provided by drum brakes on all four wheels.

The Familiale Luxe was what is offered in India as the MPV, it seated seven people comfortably in three rows of seats in a car length. The Cope deVille was a limousine offered with rear seats like sofas an jump seats for additional passengers.

 

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